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In the Kendrick-Drake dispute, women and other victims of violence are a recurring punchline

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Like everyone else, I maintained perfect attendance during the Kendrick and Drake beef.

I actually have been online at every drop and have been involved in lots of discussions about it on social media. If you would like my opinion, Kendrick won.

Kendrick won, but women and victims of grooming, pedophilia and domestic violence, in addition to children, lost. They lost, as they at all times do, because hip-hop doesn’t care about casualties in the grand scheme of things.

I won’t trouble repeating who said what to whom because there may be enough evaluation like this and you do not need my help to figure it out.

Kendrick has repeatedly accused Drake of being a loser and a skilled makeup artist who actively seeks relationships with young girls and age-inappropriate women.

Drake accused Kendrick of beating his wife and playing father to a child that will not actually be his.

All this stuff were said for the purpose of elevating each other. None of these actions were intended to lift awareness or provide justice for victims. None of these statements were made as a option to mitigate further harm to anyone.

We should not be surprised. After all, hip-hop is legendary for its rampant misogyny and blatant disregard for women.

Dr. Dre notoriously beat Dee Barnes 30 years ago in a nightclub in Hollywood. The beating has turn out to be a running joke and punchline for a lot of rappers, including Eminem and T.I. As Dee herself said on Twitter this weekend, she’s “reduced to a punch line in a song that made millions… and meanwhile I can’t pay the rent.”

Yes, I laughed together with everyone else when Kendrick pulled Drake’s dirty hair, but in some unspecified time in the future during the weekend I sobered up and realized that none of this was funny.

Kendrick writes open letters to Drake’s parents and children it was fun in the moment, but ultimately, what happens when that child (or children?) is sufficiently old to devour this art on their very own and dive deeply into its meanings?

Kendrick tried to stab Drake as over and over as he could, but had he stopped to take into consideration the harm it was doing to that child (or those children?) as well?

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Drake brings up domestic violence allegations against Kendrickbut does he do it because he cares about the safety and well-being of Kendrick’s wife, or does he do it since it helps him in his quest to make Kendrick look worse than him?

And truthfully, each the alleged pedophile and the alleged wife beater are abusers, so is there really a option to make one look higher than the other? Allegedly?

The claim that one of Kendrick’s children is just not his and that his father is in actual fact his best friend and former Top Dawg Entertainment president Dave Free is disgusting in some ways.

First, there may be a layer of him subtly shaming Kendrick’s wife while making the allegations. Even if he didn’t say it out loud, the conclusion is that your wife not only cheated on you, but in addition gave birth to a different man’s child and made you raise it like an idiot.

I would like to ask why raising one other man’s child as your individual is such a bad thing, but then I keep in mind that I exist in the same timeline where grown men openly criticize Russell Wilson for doing exactly that.

Still, Drake is “mad” at Kendrick. Why did Kendrick’s wife need to catch the homeless man?

Women have at all times been the punchline and collateral damage in hip-hop and hip-hop. Think Faith Evans.

When Tupac desired to piss off Biggie, he got the tape and claimed he slept with Faith, who was Biggie’s wife at the time. What did Faith do to deserve this?

Every criticism Kendrick made accused Drake of being a pedophile and a seducer, and while that “A minor” bar hit like hell (I by accident found myself blurting out “A-mollrrrrrrrrrrrrrr unprovoked during the day), is Kendrick attempting to help the victims or is he just embarrassing Drake?

Diddy kerfluffle’s current show shows us in real time that men in hip-hop have long been aware of the violence that women on this culture experience – sexual and otherwise – and are willing to show a blind eye to it until they feel comfortable speaking up .

In this case, Kendrick and Drake are “speaking up” but not “speaking up.”

Everyone laughs except the women and children used as bait.

Everyone is having fun except the victims.

Things appear to have died down since Kendrick released “Not Like Us” and truthfully, I hope it stays that way because we will not keep doing this.

I challenge Kendrick, Drake and anyone else in hip-hop to make a diss track calling out perpetrators of violence to stop further harm to victims.

I encourage Kendrick, Drake and everyone else in hip-hop to carry their peers accountable, and by accountable I mean in a way that forestalls them from harming others – not in a way that simply causes streams to turn out to be diss.

I encourage everyone who is an element of this culture to look at how we participate and engage in these issues.

Ultimately, gladiators fight because the crowd wants blood.

The query is, will it’s the blood of the combatants or the blood of their alleged victims that can ultimately be shed?



This article was originally published on : thegrio.com
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Zsela lets go and falls into uncertainty with her debut album “Big For You”

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LOS ANGELES (AP) – Zsela leans into the ebb and flow of uncertainty and encourages listeners to do the identical throughout her debut album, “Big For You.”

The album, which was 4 years within the making, is the follow-up to Zsela’s 2020 EP “Ache of Victory,” which she describes as “an imprint of time.”

“I’m connected to it because it will always be a part of my story, but I’m excited to talk about it with the new album,” Zsela said. “I worked rather a lot on myself and on this music. It took time. I feel really lucky that I used to be in a position to get the songs where I wanted them to be this time, and I’m really enthusiastic about where they ended up,” she said.

For Zsela, working on “Big For You” was a test of trusting her instincts and pushing herself beyond her comfort zone, each sonically and vocally.

“I actually began experimenting with my voice in a way that influenced my writing. I had this character that I used to be singing with who got here on a day where I just wasn’t feeling my voice. So I assumed, let me try something different. Really different,” Zsela said of the album’s character. When asked where a particular character appears, she simply replies, “I feel it’s more fun to depart it to the listener to seek out.”

Singer Zsela poses for a portrait on Friday, May 24, 2024, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

Zsela has a wealthy, appealing voice. Its warm tone is intertwined with upbeat, dreamy melodies and instruments, especially heard on songs like “Fire Excape” and “Not Your Angel.”

“I feel like I’ve become more confident in just the practice of experimenting, of not being so precious, of being open to people and ideas, and really trying to practice listening to myself and where I want to go, and to the outside noise of the world,” she says.

However, when starting her transformation, Zsela says she really desired to strive for “lightness, fun and lightness” in any respect times.

“I really tried to bring it into the room whenever I was alone and working on what I wanted to say,” she said. “It’s almost like opening up and letting go and experimenting.”

“Big For You” was a probability for her to see how far she could go, establishing her creative confidence and creating an enthralling and energetic album, filled with musical tension and rest.

“My friend described this album as sweaty, it feels tense and hot,” she says.

“Big For You” in Zsela’s case means “I love you”, and the album is about love and all its complexities.

“The space we fill and move into the inside of affection is large. Like being ‘full for you’ and ‘filled with you’ and the complexity of the scale of the space we occupy and fill,” the artist said.

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The Brooklyn native takes listeners on an adventure that begins with the whimsical “Lily of the Nile” and ends with “Play” – a song that she claims “ends with a question about love.”

“It’s kind of leaving the album open and hopefully making you want to start over to see what the answer is or if there is one.”

She once more teamed up with longtime Frank Ocean and FKA Twigs collaborator Daniel Aged to provide alongside Gabe Wax.

“I keep my world of colleagues quite private. And that does not imply I don’t desire to ask more, but I feel the intimacy really built loads of trust and that was really vital to create that and to have the option to experiment and find your way home. “

Zsela has played many concert events with artists comparable to Caroline Polacheck and Arooj Aftab. However, this summer she shall be embarking on her first headlining tour and is looking forward to meeting listeners who enjoy her artistry.

“I can’t wait to see who’s in these rooms,” she said. “I’m excited to play these songs live. The whole time I was making this album, all I could think about was playing them live.”

The premiere of “Big For You” is scheduled for Friday. Zsela hopes listeners will absorb the melodies, lyrics and arrangements while driving with the highest down.

This article was originally published on : thegrio.com
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Lenny Kravitz embraced being both black and Jewish, which defined who he was

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lenny kravitz black media, lenny kravitz comments, thegrio.com

Lenny Kravitz is black and Jewish, and that dichotomy has meant a lot in his life. In our Masters of the Game interview, he talked about how he was often teased as a toddler for not being fully either side. “I grew up with kids, and I’m sure you have, too, who didn’t know how to deal with it because they thought they had to fit into one or the other,” he said. – And we haven’t got to suit into both.

Kravitz says his family advised him to rise above it. He said he was taught “to accept all that you are and to honor all that you are and to know that if you have different elements, it’s a gift, that you can draw from different cultures, different things and different aspects of yourself. It gives you more opportunities to work and a greater understanding that we are all truly one. We are all the same. We all come from the same source. So I think having that mix is ​​wonderful.”

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But Kravitz had a very powerful example of being pleased with who you might be in your individual home. His mother, actress Roxie Roker, was a part of the primary interracial couple shown on television when she starred in “The Jeffersons”, one in all the best television series of the late Seventies. “The Jeffersons” focused on George Jefferson and his wife Louise, aka Weezy, who were a part of the black upper class at a time when there have been few of them within the country and none on television . Roker’s character, Helen Willis, lived near the Jeffersons and appeared in almost every episode. Helena’s husband was white. Her character helped normalize interracial relationships within the media and helped Kravitz feel higher.

Kravitz proudly told me the story of how Roker got the job – the show’s creator, Norman Lear, asked her if she can be comfortable playing a personality who had a white husband. Kravitz said Lear said, “Now listen, I just want to talk to you about this because I need to make sure you’re comfortable. Because you’re going to, you know, hug and kiss this man. I don’t know how you’ll feel about kissing a white man. She pulled out a photo of her husband. He was a white man. Lear said, “I’ll see you on Monday.”


This article was originally published on : thegrio.com
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Timbaland inducted into Songwriter Hall of Fame; SZA wins young songwriter award

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The Songwriters Hall of Fame Induction and Awards Gala was an event to not be missed.

Legendary record producer Timbaland has reportedly been inducted into the organization’s 2024 class, with fellow songwriters joining REM, Steely Dan, Hillary Lindsey and Dean Pitchford. Hollywood reporter.

Missy Elliott, Timbaland’s longtime collaborator and the primary female rapper inducted into the Songwriters Hall, was in attendance and paid tribute to the producer. Timbaland you should definitely thank Elliott and several other other artists he has worked with, including Aaliyah, Jay-Z, Justin Timberlake and Magoo.

“I owe my career to Missy Elliott,” he said during his award acceptance speech to THR. He concluded with gratitude to Songwriters Hall: “Thank you for giving me a seat at the table – I’ve been waiting for a long time.”

SZA speaks on stage on the 2024 Songwriters Hall of Fame Induction and Awards Gala on June 13, 2024 in New York City. (Photo: Bennett Raglin/Getty Images for Songwriters Hall Of Fame)

Timbaland wasn’t the one artist within the R&B and hip-hop space to win the award. Singer SZA won the Hal David Starlight Award, an honor given to young songwriters. The Grammy winner, whose “SOS” was amongst the most important albums of 2023, sang an acoustic version of her song “Snooze” on the ceremony.

“I have exceeded all my wildest dreams,” SZA said during her award acceptance speech, per People. “I’m just so grateful. Thank you for seeing me. I swear I’ll be like, “Oh, I wrote this and I wrote that.” And (people) would say, ‘OK,’ especially in case you’re a lady, especially in case you’re a black woman. So winning this… just means the world.

Songwriters Hall chairman Nile Rodgers presented the award to SZA, who stated that she was “many different people” as an artist.

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“I weighed 200 pounds. I weigh 130 pounds,” SZA said. “I used to be a one that didn’t dance on stage in any respect, a one that could only close her eyes and look down, a one that danced and gave her all. I just went through all this and thought, “Oh my gosh, I’m struggling with being an artist.” As if writing made me feel like an individual, that I had value and will show that I used to be smart, and it went beyond the query: “Am I pretty?” Am I liked? And that principally meant the whole lot to me.

“It made me feel like a human being, that I was doing something valuable,” she concluded. “Basically, receiving this award validates my entire career.”

This article was originally published on : thegrio.com
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