Connect with us

Education

How Columbia University’s complex history with the student protest movement resonates today

Published

on

NEW YORK (AP) – Students are taking on space and demanding change. University administrators under pressure to regain control. Police brought in to make arrests. In other schools: students concentrate and sometimes take motion.

Columbia University, 2024. And Columbia University, 1968.

The pro-Palestinian demonstration and subsequent arrests in Colombia, which have now sparked similar protests on campuses across the country and even internationally, are nothing latest for college kids at the Ivy League school. They are the latest in a Colombian tradition that dates back greater than fifty years – which also helped encourage anti-apartheid protests in the Eighties, protests during the Iraq War, and more.

“When you go to Columbia, you know you’re going to an institution that holds a proud place in the history of American protests,” said Mark Naison, a professor of history and African-American studies at Fordham University, who was himself a participant in the 1968 demonstrations. “Whenever there is a movement , you know Columbia will be there.”

Students are aware of history

Students collaborating on this month’s demonstrations emphasize that it is a component of Colombia’s tradition – something recognized by the school itself in a program marking the anniversary and taught in classes.

“Many of the students here are aware of what happened in 1968,” said Sofia Ongele, 23, who was amongst those that joined the camp in response to this month’s arrests.

People take heed to a speaker at a pro-Palestinian camp who advocates financial disclosure and divestment from all corporations linked to Israel and calls for a everlasting ceasefire in Gaza at Columbia University on Sunday in New York. (Photo: Andres Kudacki/AP

The end of the academic yr was also approaching in April this yr, when students took over five campus buildings. There were many reasons. Some protested against the university’s affiliation with an institute that researched weapons for the Vietnam War; others objected to the elite school’s treatment of black and brown residents in the communities around the school, in addition to the atmosphere amongst minority students.

After a couple of days, the president of Colombia authorized the arrival of a thousand New York law enforcement officials who were to remove most of the demonstrators. The arrests, which numbered 700, weren’t lenient. Fists were flying and batons were swinging. Dozens of scholars and a number of other officers were injured.

History has never been forgotten. This includes when pro-Palestinian students calling on the university to chop all economic ties with Israel over the war in Gaza arrange a tent camp earlier this month and greater than 100 people were arrested. This helped spark similar demonstrations on campuses across the country and the world.

The long history of protests is one in every of the reasons Ongele selected Columbia for school and got here here from her hometown of Santa Clarita, California. “I wanted to be in an environment where people were actually socially aware,” she said.

As for the protest, “We have not only the privilege, but the responsibility to continue to follow those who came before us,” Onngele said. The goal, she said: to be certain that “we’re able to take care of the integrity of this university as a very socially conscious university, one where students truly care about what is occurring in the world, what is occurring in our communities and what is occurring in the lives of the students who make up our community.”

Columbia University officials didn’t reply to an e-mail asking about the university’s position on the aftermath of the 1968 events. Those events, like the current protest, “sparked a huge surge in student activism across the country,” Mark Rudd, a protest leader, said in an email to The Associated Press. “I and others spent the entire year after April 1968 traveling around the country spreading the spirit of Colombia on campuses.”

Not everyone supports the protests

But the echoes of the past should not only an inspiration. Then, as now, the protest had its detractors. Naison said the disruption to campus life and law and order has angered many individuals at Columbia and beyond.

Featured Stories

“Student protesters are not popular in the United States,” he said. “We weren’t popular in the 1960s. We have achieved a huge amount. But we also helped move the country to the right.”

This is now having repercussions amongst those critical of the protests, who’re decrying what they see as a descent into anti-Semitism. Some Jewish students said they felt targeted due to their identity and were afraid to be on campus, and university presidents got here under political pressure to make use of other methods, corresponding to police intervention.

Columbia University President Minouche Shafik had just testified before a congressional panel investigating concerns about anti-Semitism at elite schools when the camp began. Even though she demanded police motion the next day due to what she called a “harassing and intimidating environment,” congressional Republicans called on her to resign.

“Freedom of speech is very important, but it does not go beyond the right to be safe,” said Itai Dreifuss, 25, a third-year student who grew up in the United States and Israel. He was near the camp last week, standing in front of posters taped to the wall depicting people taken hostage by Hamas in the Oct. 7 attack that sparked the current conflagration.

Naison said the feeling amongst some students that there may be personal animosity against them is the difference between 1968 and today. The conflict between demonstrators and their condemners “is much more emotional,” Naison says, which he says makes this an excellent more tense time.

“It’s history repeating itself, but it’s also uncharted territory,” he said. “Here we have a whole group of people who see these protests as a natural extension of the fight for justice, and a whole other group of people who see this as a deadly attack on themselves, on their history and tradition. And this makes management very difficult for university authorities.”


This article was originally published on : thegrio.com
Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Education

National No Child Care Day: DC should not balance its budget at the expense of our children

Published

on

By

As a mother and community organizer, I look to my children and others to see the hopes and guarantees for his or her future. I’m also keenly aware of the importance of systems that promote the health and well-being of our children, which makes DC Budget cuts proposed by Mayor Muriel Bowser to the child welfare system, which is the cornerstone of every child’s well-being at an early stage of development, which is deeply disturbing to me and other parents and social activists.

The work of child care providers has been economically devalued since: the days when enslaved African women forcibly raised white children. Bowser’s budget cuts reinforce the slavery-era belief that black and brown child care employees do not deserve fair wages. These women are the invisible backbone of American communities and economies. They deserve a salary that can provide them with an honest standard of living. The DC Mayor and Council should put money into our children the same way they put money into millionaires. That’s why we’re working tirelessly to stop this from happening again.

May 13 is National Day Without Child Care (DWOCC), a day for child care providers to advocate for our government systems to create cheaper and accessible child care. As proud members of the Raising Child Care Fund, we are going to focus our efforts today on urging Mayor Bowser to say no to harmful cuts to the child care budget.

On April 3, Mayor Bowser proposed a budget for fiscal 12 months 2025 that eliminates it entirely Early Childhood Education Equalization Fund. The Pay Equality Fund (PEF) was established in 2021 under birth law for 3 years for all DC residents enacted in 2018. This program proposed everlasting funding to assist offer direct payments to child care professionals and employers to bring child care employees’ wages and advantages in step with their colleagues in the DC public school system.

In 2019, before the National Federation of Feedbackers DC Average Income was $15.36 for a babysitter in comparison with $33.10 for a preschool teacher and $44.16 per hour for an elementary school teacher. The implementation of the Pay Equity Fund in 2022 and 2023 has helped fill this gap paying $80 million to over 4,000 preschool teachers and their facilities to extend wages and salaries. DC relatively expensive standard of living implies that any potential fall in childcare wages to the minimum wage will force many employees to search out alternative employment.

Another PEF program, Health4CareChild care, provided teachers caring for young children with free or low-cost medical insurance. It is estimated that 16% of child care employees under the age of 65 are uninsured in comparison with 4.23% of teachers. The loss of this program will leave many employees uninsured or underinsured, which could also be the case further and disproportionately widen health disparities impact on Black communities in DC

DC has moreover proposed cutting $10 million from the child care subsidy program, which has helped lower child care costs for low-income families. Only current DC child care offers serve 71% of demand. Lower wages combined with subsidy cuts will result in an excellent greater lack of child care available to DC families.

Education

These cuts to the child care budget are a profound betrayal of the guarantees made by the DC mayor and council members to early childhood educators, especially provided that DC has increased education requirements and regulations for child care employees.

In December 2023, DC it required all its manpower in little children have child development credentials or an educational degree. Relatively, only five other states require similar minimum credentials. Increasing educational requirements while abandoning guarantees of increased pay for this predominantly black workforce is deeply damaging to the economic and mental well-being of our child care employees.

The DC government justified these budget cuts by stating that DC needed to search out funds to replenish its reserve funds. Bowser’s budget though attached $3.1 million for juvenile justice centers, $32 million for tourism and marketing subsidies and $551 million for downtown Chinatown revitalization.

Additionally, Tazra Mitchell, director of policy and strategy at the DC Fiscal Policy Institutehe wrote on Twitter “In 2021, the CFO’s office told me that DC had only spent about 75% of its cash flow reserve at any given time.”

The DC government decides to chop child care teaching programs that positively impact Black communities in favor of programs that impact corporate profits to be able to solve the money flow problem. This is an unjust act of democracy that we cannot allow to prevail.

As community members who consider in moving DC toward a caring economy, we’re dedicating our time, attention and resources to urging the DC Mayor and Council not to show their backs on child care employees.

On May 13, we plan to host caregivers and fogeys in the Wilson Building, which houses the mayor’s and council members’ offices. We will probably be hosting office hours and meetings with council members Phil Mendelson, Jeneese Lewis George, Kenyan McDuffee, Christina Henderson and others supporting the restoration of the pay equity fund. SPACE in Action may also host automotive brigades and display banners calling on the DC Council to maintain its promise to child care providers.

Proposed budget cuts to the child care system will threaten the physical and economic health of greater than 4,000 child care employees, mostly Black and Brown. This will worsen an already deepening child care crisis that has left so many families unable to search out inexpensive and accessible take care of their children. The tangible consequences of cutting child care will outweigh the imagined advantages gained from increasing DC’s rainy day fund.

At DWOCC, join us in urging the DC mayor and council members to guard our children’s future by protecting our early childhood educators in the present. No child’s educational development or caregivers’ livelihood should be limited to be able to balance the budget.


.


This article was originally published on : thegrio.com
Continue Reading

Education

The mother-daughter duo graduated from Rutgers School of Social Work together

Published

on

By

Is Rutgers a good school for social work?

Congratulations are to ensure that one mother-daughter duo.

Latonya Johnson, 43, and Laila Birchett, 21, graduated together from the School of Social Work at Rutgers University on Sunday. the institution made available.

“I took my first college course in 1999.” said Johnson, a divorced mother of six whose children range in age from 4 to 26. “From 1999 to the present, I have tried to go back in time six times, but to no avail. I couldn’t manage my time properly because I was a wife, mother and worked full-time.”

In addition to being a full-time mother before enrolling at Rutgers, Johnson worked full-time and took classes part-time. Birchett suggested that they attend school together, prompting her mother to cut back her working hours and enroll at university in September 2022.

“Her journey has been truly inspiring,” Birchett said of her mother. “It encouraged me to work harder in college.”

Featured Stories

The former Montclair State student knew she desired to pursue a field that may allow her to assist others, especially the homeless and the elderly. Johnson previously worked as an authorized alcohol and drug counselor.

At Rutgers, the mother-daughter duo attended different classes but had the identical teacher. They relied on one another for support, from computer technology to real-life experiences.

“There were times when I struggled to cope in school,” Birchett said. People Magazine reported. “But I always thought if my mom could do it, I could do it.”

Johnson and Birchett will enroll within the Rutgers Master of Social Work program this fall.

“My family — my kids, my mom and dad — they’re all proud because it’s two generations going to college together,” Johnson said, in keeping with Rutgers. “I never thought that in one million years I’d go to high school with my daughter and graduate from the identical university and the identical field. It’s a bit of surreal, but it surely has brought us closer together because we’ve got connected on a level I never thought I’d have the option to attach with my children.


This article was originally published on : thegrio.com
Continue Reading

Education

A Virginia school board voted to restore Confederate names at two schools. I bet even Robert E. Lee is confused.

Published

on

By

Panama Jackson theGrio.com

Many years ago, I took my wife on her first trip to the Deep South, during which we made an 11-hour trip from Washington, D.C. to Huntsville, Alabama, to visit my parents. My wife, who is from Ghana and moved to New Jersey at age 11 before attending Howard University, had never been to the South before. Sure, she was in Miami, but I think we will all agree that Miami and anywhere in Alabama should not the identical.

Like many individuals from, well, anywhere else, she was very anxious in regards to the trip. Between all of the documentaries in regards to the Civil Rights Movement, history, racist white people, and the final notion that “the South is a place where racism thrives,” she was quite concerned about being kicked with the n-word, potentially kidnapped, and was an ancestor just crossing the imaginary border to the “South”. I assured her that wasn’t the case, but we soon had our first (humorous) encounter with racism.

No greater than two hours outside of DC, we stopped for a rest stop so my kids could use the restroom. We were just outside the border of Northern Virginia, which is not an independent state, but anyone who lives within the DC area knows the difference between “Virginia” and “Northern Virginia,” which is just like the difference between Atlanta and Georgia. A whole group of motorcyclists with Confederate flags on their shirts were parked at the facilities. I talked to one in all the bikers in regards to the weather and we each went our separate ways, but she felt justified. Racism was waiting for us as soon as we hit Virginia. I laughed it off, but I couldn’t disagree with it either.

Education

This memory is the very first thing I considered when I read the recent news in regards to the all-white school board in Shenandoah County, Virginia, voting againwrite down the names of the two schools originally named after racists and losers – Stonewall Jackson, Robert E. Lee and Turner Ashby. The two schools in query, now Mountain View High School and Honey Run Elementary School, were renamed within the wake of George Floyd’s murder in 2020, when people made the historically correct decision to remove Confederate symbols and rename schools named after LOSERS CIVIL WAR.

I cannot emphasize enough how idiotic I think it is to honor the losers of the war that tore the country apart, but white people will likely be white people, you recognize? I bet even Stonewall Jackson and Nem will likely be like, “Really??? Wow… what a bunch of idiots. We lost. If we had won, we certainly wouldn’t have had any schools named after Union generals!” Robert E. Lee even against monuments after every little thing was said and done. Why? Because putting up monuments and stuff like that it could be too divisive. What are we even doing here?

Despite what number of community members didn’t want to change the names back to Stonewall Jackson High School and Ashby Lee Elementary, the conservative school board stated, “Yes, we definitely need to put these racists back on the field! LEGACY, NOT HATE!” Forget what message this sends to students of color in these schools; it is more vital to honor the LOSERS of the Civil War because clearly the defenders of slavery and racism were people of high moral standing and character, more so than the school board that modified names after the 2020 murder of George Floyd.

My God.

It’s bad enough that racists have gained momentum through the years with “critical race theory” bans and reversing diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives, but now districts are actively bringing racists into schools? Deliberately? White people never stop to amaze me with their boldness and audacity. Especially since everyone knows what happens from here; the proven fact that something like this happened on this case signifies that other school districts may follow suit, not for a very good reason, but to make some extent. The proven fact that I hate it here really doesn’t describe how I feel.

The aliens (and Robert E. Lee) have to be very confused.


Panama Jackson theGrio.com

This article was originally published on : thegrio.com
Continue Reading
Advertisement

OUR NEWSLETTER

Subscribe Us To Receive Our Latest News Directly In Your Inbox!

We don’t spam! Read our privacy policy for more info.

Trending