google-site-verification=cXrcMGa94PjI5BEhkIFIyc9eZiIwZzNJc4mTXSXtGRM
Connect with us

Education

Target is recalling a product that misidentifies black historical figures

Published

on

Target has recalled an academic product for Black History Month after misidentifying several Black historical figures.

According to USA todayretail company will not sell “Civil Rights Magnetic Science Activity” after misidentifying Booker T. Washington, Carter G. Woodson and W. E. B. Du Bois.

An worker collects shopping carts within the car parking zone of a Target store in June 2021 in Highlands Ranch, Colorado. Target is pulling a product from shelves in honor of Black History Month after misidentifying black icons. (Photo: Dawid Zalubowski/AP, Akt)

The discrepancies got here to light after @issatete, a TikTok user who identified himself as a US history teacher, uploaded a video showing errors and comparing misidentified people in a kid’s item with historical images downloaded from a search engine.

She published the video on Tuesday. As of Thursday evening, it had received about 800,000 views.

Featured Stories

As of Thursday, the product’s creator, Bendon Publishing, had not responded to USA Today.

“We will no longer sell this product in stores or online,” Target said in a statement to USA Today on Thursday. “We also made sure the product publisher was aware of the errors.”


This article was originally published on : thegrio.com
Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Education

A Chinese-American family donated $5 million to the University of California to thank a black family for hiring them

Published

on

By

San Diego State University

“Look at the Good that others do when least expected” – 360WiSE

Gus and Emma Thompson, who were able to purchase property in Coronado before racial restrictions on renting and buying homes, rented to Lloyd Dong Sr. and his family in the early 1900s.

A Chinese-American family has donated $5 million to a California college in honor of two black homeowners who rented apartments to their parents 85 years ago during racist housing practices in the early twentieth century.

According to Los Angeles Times, Gus and Emma Thompson – a black couple who managed to purchase real estate in Coronado, California before racial restrictions on renting and buying homes – bravely rented one of their houses to Lloyd Dong Sr. and his wife. The Dongs finally owned it.

Ron Dong and Lloyd Dong Jr., sons of Lloyd Dong Sr., are donating $5 million to the Black Resource Center at San Diego State University from their share of the proceeds from the sale of the property.

San Diego State University
The Black Resource Center at San Diego State University received $5 million from two Chinese-American brothers from the sale of property their parents rented from a black couple in the early 1900s. The Dongs eventually became owners of the property. (Photo: AdobeStock)

Principal Brandon Gamble said the gift would expand scholarships for black students and fund future renovations to the center.

“I don’t know how to describe the feeling in my chest, but people know the feeling of racism; you might not be able to describe it all the time,” Gamble said. “It’s the complete opposite and we don’t have enough access to it.”

Gus Thompson was born into slavery in Kentucky in 1859, two years before the Civil War, and moved to Coronado at the age of twenty in search of work and a recent starting.

He quickly gained respect in the San Diego area and founded the Prince Hall Masonic Lodge for middle-class black men to gather and discuss civil rights. In 1893, he married Emma, ​​who ran a coffee tent in the Coronado tent city where locals and visitors went to eat, shop, and sleep.

The Thompsons were amongst the few black real estate investors in Coronado who purchased multiple properties before the National Association of Real Estate Boards formally implemented racial discrimination procedures in the Nineteen Twenties.

They used their influence as leaders of the Black community in greater San Diego to help Asian Americans in Coronado, who were also victims of racist acts during that era.

“It’s just something you do because there was a lot of oppression, so you also help people who were at risk,” said the Thompsons’ great-grandson, Ballinger Gardner Kemp, 76. “The beautiful thing to me is that it wasn’t considered something like that great.”

In 1939, the Thompsons rented their house to Lloyd Dong Sr. and his wife under a lease-to-own arrangement. They also rented a room in another of their properties to Lloyd Dong Sr.’s younger brother, George, after he returned from serving in World War II.

Eight years after Gus Thompson’s death in 1947, Emma Thompson sold one property to George Dong and two to Lloyd Dong Sr., including a stable built in 1902 that served as a boarding house for Blacks.

In 1957, Dong Sr. converted the stables into an apartment building, which, including the house, is now valued at over $7 million.

The Dong children are too young to remember the Thompsons, but they have memories of growing up in Coronado that include experiencing discrimination because they are Asian. They knew they wanted to donate a portion of the proceeds from the sale of the property to the community when an area historian contacted them in 2022 and learned of the Thompson family connections.

“We have other property and my nieces and nephews already have a place,” Lloyd Dong Jr. said, “so I thought I’d give it to someone who could benefit from it.”

!function(){var g=window;g.googletag=g.googletag||{},g.googletag.cmd=g.googletag.cmd||(),g.googletag.cmd.push(function(){ g.googletag.pubads().setTargeting(“has-recommended-video”,”true”)})}();var _bp=_bp||();_bp.push({“div”:”Brid_21904″, “obj”:{“id”:”41122″,”width”:”1280″,”height”:”720″,”stickyDirection”:”below”,”playlist”:”21904″,”slide_inposition”:” .widget_tpd_ad_widget_sticky”}});

Featured Stories

The post A Chinese-American family donated $5 million to the University of California to thank a black family for hiring them appeared first on TheGrio.

 

This article was originally published on : thegrio.com
Continue Reading

Education

University of Texas professors demand reversal of layoffs in closed DEI initiative

Published

on

By

Texas professors estimate 60 positions cut in violation of employees’ rights to academic freedom, due process and free speech

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) – A gaggle of professors is demanding that the University of Texas reverse course this week on job cuts amid the shutdown of a diversity, equity and inclusion program that was impacted by one of probably the most widespread bans on such initiatives in the country.

Officials on the 52,000-student university, one of the biggest college campuses in the U.S., didn’t say what number of jobs were eliminated. University President Jay Hartzell told the campus in a letter this week that additional measures can be taken to comply with the brand new state law. He said the university plans to shut its campus and community engagement department, which runs programs that support student learning and community constructing.

Hartzell’s statement also said that associate deans and associate deans who focused on DEI initiatives will return to their full-time faculty positions, and positions for workers who supported them will now not be funded.

In this Thursday, November 29, 2012 photo, ivy grows near an indication at the doorway to the University of Texas in Austin, Texas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

The chapter of the American Association of University Professors estimated that 60 people in DEI positions on campus had been laid off, but didn’t say how that number got here about. In a letter sent Thursday, the group argued that the cuts violate employees’ rights to academic freedom, due process and free speech. He also criticized what he called the shortage of transparency in how decisions were made and the the explanation why the school council’s comments weren’t taken into consideration.

“While this was clearly not the intention, such actions may lead to a loss of trust and a perception of dishonesty,” the letter said.

The changes come after public universities in Texas were forced to make quick changes to comply with a brand new law passed last yr by the Republican-controlled state House. Known as Senate Bill 17, it’s one of the strictest bans on diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives and went into effect on January 1.

School officials didn’t immediately reply to a request for comment Friday. This week, the university declined to reply questions on the number of faculty and staff affected by the cuts.

The recent Texas law applies to greater than 30 Texas public institutions that serve greater than 600,000 higher education students. Prohibits universities from influencing hiring practices through affirmative motion and other approaches that keep in mind applicants’ race, gender or ethnicity. It also prohibits the promotion of “differential” or “preferential” treatment or so-called “special” advantages for people based on those categories and prohibits training and activities conducted “with respect to race, color, ethnicity, gender identity or sexual orientation.”

At least five other states have already passed their very own bans. This yr, Republican lawmakers in greater than a dozen other states are pushing to enact various restrictions on diversity initiatives, a move some hope will mobilize voters this election yr. The laws focuses totally on higher education, although some also restrict DEI efforts in K-12 schools, state government, contracting and retirement investing.

The decision by University of Texas leaders to shut the campus community engagement department got here days after Republican state Sen. Brandon Creighton, who authored the bill, sent letters to the regents of multiple public university systems inviting them to testify before state lawmakers in regards to the changes adapted to the brand new law.

Creighton also warned that simply changing the name of programs wouldn’t be considered compliance and reiterated that failure to comply may lead to varsities losing funding.

!function(){var g=window;g.googletag=g.googletag||{},g.googletag.cmd=g.googletag.cmd||(),g.googletag.cmd.push(function(){ g.googletag.pubads().setTargeting(“film-recommended-film”,”true”)})}();

Featured Stories

The post University of Texas professors demand reversal of worker layoffs over stalled DEI initiative appeared first on TheGrio.

This article was originally published on : thegrio.com
Continue Reading

Education

The Black Student Association organizes a sit-in at the University of Washington in St. Louis, claiming the school encourages racism

Published

on

By

The Black Student Association protested against racial bullying after a group of students uttered racial slurs in a campus dining hall

ST. LOUIS (AP) – Black Student Association at Washington University in St. Louis staged a sit-in protest Friday in the dining hall where last month a group of students allegedly threw eggs, stood on tables and used racial slurs in front of an audience of racial minority staff.

University spokeswoman Julie Flory said in a statement that the private university “does not release information about any specific incident or investigation involving our students or other members of our community.”

A police officer drives past Brookings Hall on the University of Washington campus, Wednesday, March 11, 2020, in St. Louis, Missouri (Robert Cohen/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP, File)

“We are working directly with our students and other members of our community to address their concerns,” Flory said.

Dining room staff felt intimidated and uncomfortable when students jumped on tables, spat at one another and used racial slurs on March 21, local food staff union president David Cook said. Shipping by post from St. Louis.

The Black Student Association told the newspaper that almost all of the staff that night were from racial minorities.

State senator of St. Louis Democratic Party leader Karla May said in a statement Friday that she has contacted student advocates and campus officials “to ensure steps are taken to address these blatant acts of racism.”

The Black Student Association gathered in the cafeteria Friday to write down thanks and show support for the employees who were present during the alleged incident, which the group said “was not an isolated incident of violence.”

“It shows that racism is still part of the culture and has been perpetuated at the University of Washington, elite institutions and historically white organizations for far too long,” the group said in a statement posted on the social media platform Instagram.

!function(){var g=window;g.googletag=g.googletag||{},g.googletag.cmd=g.googletag.cmd||(),g.googletag.cmd.push(function(){ g.googletag.pubads().setTargeting(“film-recommended-film”,”true”)})}();

Featured Stories

Posted after black student association stages sit-in at Washington University in St. Louis, accommodates allegations that the school fosters racism, appeared first on TheGrio.

This article was originally published on : thegrio.com
Continue Reading
Advertisement

OUR NEWSLETTER

Subscribe Us To Receive Our Latest News Directly In Your Inbox!

We don’t spam! Read our privacy policy for more info.

Trending